The Atlantic Brass Quintet will gladly craft the perfect program for your concert. The following programs are three they particularly recommend, drawing from several aspects of their musical language.

 

Program A

Handel: Vivace from the Concerto Grosso in D major, Op. 3, No. 6

Shostakovich: Prelude & Fugue in A major, Op. 87, No. 7

Bach: Prelude & Fugue in A major, BWV 888 (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II)

Catherine Likhuta: Apex Predators (ABQ commission, 2015)

    —Intermission—

David Maslanka: Arise (1987)

Victor Ewald: Quintet No. 3 in D-flat major, Op. 7 (c. 1912)

“Balkan Party”

Boban Marković: Zvonce Kolo

Tomasz Kukurba/Tomasz Lato: Sat

Traditional Rroma (arr. Howard): Bubamara

 

Program B

Handel: Vivace from the Concerto Grosso in D major, Op. 3, No. 6

Bach: French Suite No. 4 in E-flat major

Andrew Sorg: Voices in Da Fan (2014)

    —Intermission—

David Maslanka: Arise (1987)

Kevin Walczyk: Balkan Dances (2015)

Victor Ewald: Quintet No. 3 in D-flat major, Op. 7 (c. 1912)

“Balkan Party”

Boban Marković: Zvonce Kolo

Tomasz Kukurba/Tomasz Lato: Sat

Traditional Rroma (arr. Howard): Bubamara

 

Program C

Handel: Vivace from the Concerto Grosso in D major, Op. 3, No. 6

Shostakovich: Prelude & Fugue in A major, Op. 87, No. 7

Bach: Prelude & Fugue in A major, BWV 888 (Well-Tempered Clavier, Book II)

Victor Ewald: Quintet No. 3 in D-flat major, Op. 7 (c. 1912)

    —Intermission—

Catherine Likhuta: Apex Predators (ABQ commission, 2015)

Andrew Sorg: Voices in Da Fan (2014)

“Balkan Party”

Boban Marković: Zvonce Kolo

Tomasz Kukurba/Tomasz Lato: Sat

Traditional Rroma (arr. Howard): Bubamara

 

 

PROGRAM NOTES

 

Catherine Likhuta: Apex Predators (2015)

 

Apex predators are the creatures residing at the top of food chains (sharks, saltwater crocodiles, giant snakes, and the like). They are powerful killing machines, whose sole purpose in life is to commit despicable crimes on a daily basis, without any punishment. They barge in on the habitats of the weaker ones and bring massive destruction and terror. They deserve to be hated but also respected. We are disgusted and terrified by them, while admitting that they are also strangely enthralling... They are fascinating to watch (on a TV documentary only!) while extremely repulsive, gracious while heavy. Their desires and emotions are rather primitive, but nature granted them with the most complex physiology and preying mechanisms to assist in the satisfaction of those desires. Every ecosystem on the planet relies on its apex predators for holding things in balance; therefore, we should be thankful for their contribution. But to me, they are a merciless bunch of gangsters who never fail to terrorize and claim their confident victory.

 

Apex Predators was written for the Atlantic Brass Quintet.

 

--Catherine Likhuta

 

 

David Maslanka: Arise!

 

Arise! was written for the Aries Brass Quintet of Denver, Colorado. They had asked for a brief, energetic concert opener, and so the feel of the piece and its title (“Arise” from “Aries”) popped into mind at the same instant.

Arise! mixes old and new. Its harmonies and rhythms are more nearly modern, yet its propulsive nature, and its continuous working out of a small number of motives and thematic fragments is very Baroque.

 

--David Maslanka

 

 

Kevin Walczyk: Balkan Dances (2015)

 

Balkan Dances was commissioned by the Atlantic Brass Quintet and utilizes the asymmetrical rhythmic traits of specific folk dances from the Balkan Peninsula, particularly those from Bulgaria. The single-movement work comprises of four contrasting sections.

 

The first section is based on the rhythmic attributes of two folk songs originating from Western Bulgaria: “Dilmano, dilbero” (“Dilmana, the beautiful girl”) and the “Kopanitsa” folk dance. “Dilmano, dilbero” is noted for its distinctive asymmetrical rhythms of 8/8 and 11/8 meters, resulting in an energetic, fast-paced song commonly performed at weddings. The “Kopanitsa” is also a lively asymmetrical line dance in 11/8 and referred to as the “little digging” dance.

 

The rustic line dance, “Pravo horo,” is featured in the second section of the work. It is characterized by an alternating pattern of duple and triple beat sub-divisions within a constant symmetrical meter. The “Pravo horo,” performed at weddings, feasts, and celebrations, is considered the national dance of Bulgaria and is common throughout the Balkan Peninsula with slight variations.

 

The slow, lyrical third section obtains its phrase structures by combining two different Balkan folk dances: the “Lesnoto horo,” a slow line dance in 7/8 meter, and the graceful “Varnensko horo,” which utilizes the asymmetrical meter of 11/8. The “Lesnoto horo” (“simple” or “light” dance), originating from Macedonia and Bulgaria, is regarded as the region’s most common dance form in both traditional and modern music. The “Varnensko Horo” originates from the Eastern Bulgarian city of Varna, which is situated on the Black Sea.

 

The final section of Balkan Dances reprises portions of “Dilmano, dilbero” and the “Kopanistsa,” but at a slightly slower tempo. As fragments of these two sources alternate, the tempo gradually quickens, culminating in one final energetic statement of the “Dilmano, dilbero” rhythmic motive.

 

--Kevin Walczyk