“The dynamic violist Hsin-Yun Huang.”
— THE NEW YORK TIMES

“A compelling performance.”
— THE NEW YORK TIMES

“An electrifying performance.”
— THE STRAD

“Superb artistry. … Her tone was rich and earthy, and she negotiated each phrase with remarkable agility and expressive acumen.”
— CHICAGO TRIBUNE

“Hsin-Yun Huang’s recent Williams Hall recital … showed — above and beyond the high technical command, which the ear quickly took for granted — a heartening flexibility, keenness, alertness to context. … In Bach’s Suite No. 6, the prevailing sound was of sweetness, fullness, fleetness. In the musical results she generated tension that took its force from letting you hear frankly how Bach had composed this music. The sublime joinery had its voice, likewise the sense of those ghostly, implied harmonies. None of it was self-consciously, point-scoringly “free”; and for the best of reasons, it didn’t have to be. A rather firmer manner was just what the doctor ordered for the Sonata for Viola and Piano (1939) of Paul Hindemith. … Hsin-Yun Huang and Thomas Sauer left no doubt that this was top-drawer Hindemith — lean, athletic, zestful, and saying yes to life.”
— THE BOSTON GLOBE

“Taiwanese-born Hsin-Yun Huang gave an energy-filled account of the solo part in Bartók’s Viola Concerto. … The violist grouped moments of brilliance, lyricism, and expressivity around the central, glowing Adagio religioso.”
— BERLINER MORGENPOST

“Things improved, however, from piece to piece, for which not a little credit is due to viola virtuoso Hsin-Yun Huang, born in Taipei in 1971. … Glamorous as she looks, her playing is easily a match for her appearance. She presented Bartók’s Viola Concerto — hardly an unproblematic work, surviving as it does only in fragmentary sketches — in a seamlessly rhetorical brilliance and a warm tone, which flashed forth, virtually violin-like now and then — so that the fragmentary nature of the piece became a background issue.”
— DER TAGESSPIEGEL (Berlin)